Fire Famine & Flood / by Megan Hollingsworth

Three independent mothers, you might call them virgins,

sat at the round table. Freyja asked softly 

as she dripped tears into the spoon,

How long will they last trading seed for gold?

Lakshmi  said, Patience my love. Eventually, 

they will come around.

Kali had seen enough. She stood, knocking her chair over

and screaming as she smacked her hands on the table,

BURN THE FOREST. THAT WILL TEACH THEM!

Freyja and Lakshmi, knowing not to question Kali's command,

set forth to do their part. Freyja dried up barley fields 

while Kali set fire to the water there. 

Lakshmi brought torrential rains to the coast, 

while Kali boiled the ocean's depths.

All three of them distraught by the destruction. 

A mother will do anything to keep her child 

from running blind over the cliff. 

She will cripple him if she must. She thinks,

If only he knew how much he is loved. 

Be Sane. / still overlay from MOTHER LODE / artwork, 'Block Energy' by Morgan Rua / waildance.com

Be Sane. / still overlay from MOTHER LODE / artwork, 'Block Energy' by Morgan Rua / waildance.com

 

see Freyja, Norse goddess of fertility; Lakshmi, Hindu goddess of wealth and beauty; and Kali, Hindu goddess of fierce love, destroyer of false consciousness

Note: Clinging to money's forceful, false power remains prevalent among some men and women who are otherwise philanthropic and many more who are not. This clinging is understandable in light of these individual's legitimate fear that they will be socially abandoned otherwise. We tend to cling to what we know and what we are told is secure in scarce times such as this. False power, or force, drives the ruin. Power is reciprocal. Benevolence fosters resilient community. In agriculture, false power looks like killing everyone in the field except those whom I wish to consume. False power is not only cruel, it's suicide. Please watch ĀINA: That Which Feeds Us

"And most of all to share Aloha...to share love and to respect one to another. That's all I ask." ~Sabra Kauka in ʻĀINA: That Which Feeds Us